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  • 8w32rc41z?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Southern Methodist University Bridwell Library and Ohio State University Libraries
    Description: Nightingall, whom Foxe identifies as a Roman Catholic parson at Crondall in Kent, falls from his pulpit and into his congregation. The death supposedly occurs while the tonsured Nightingall had preached that the pope has authority to pardon sins. According to Foxe, his death demonstrates providential disapproval of papal authority. Individual members of Nightingall's congregation hold rosary beads. (See also the lower right panel on the title page woodcut in this collection.) This woodcut appears in the second (1570), third (1576), and fourth (1583) editions. Luborsky and Ingram 11223/65. JPEG file (4.05 MB).
  • M900p156r?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Southern Methodist University Bridwell Library and Ohio State University Libraries
    Description: “The description of a Popish Priest, who when he had taken away the Glory and office of Christ, fell down suddenly, and died." Nightingall, the priest, falls from the pulpit into the congregation below him while delivering a sermon. As he falls, he says: "I am cleansed from my Sins." Revised version of Luborsky and Ingram 11223/65, which appears in each of the second (1570), third (1576), and fourth (1583) early English editions. JPEG file (438 KB).
  • Br86b8678?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Southern Methodist University Bridwell Library and Ohio State University Libraries
    Description: Latimer ("M. Latimer." ["Master Latimer"]) preaches from a large open-air pulpit, which has been erected in the Privy Garden at Whitehall Palace. Among his audience is King Edward VI ("K. Edward." ["King Edward"]), who listens, with three others, from indoors at a window at the left of the image. The woman who reads an open Bible at Latimer's feet may allude to Catherine Brandon, Duchess of Suffolk, who funded the activities of Latimer and other English Protestant evangelicals during Edward's reign. This woodcut appears in the first through fourth editions (1563, 1570, 1576, and 1583), but John Day first uses it in his edition of Latimer's 27 sermons (London: John Day, 1562). Luborsky and Ingram 11222/37, 11223/80, 15276/1. JPEG file (1.01 MB).
  • G732dg774?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Southern Methodist University Bridwell Library and Ohio State University Libraries
    Description: In this overhead view of Smithfield, Askew and two companions stand chained to stakes and await martyrdom. Workers prepare faggots, and a very large crowd observes, some from windows and surrounding roofs. Nicholas Shaxton, the one-time Bishop of Salisbury who resigned his bishopric following the passage of the Act of Six Articles (1539), preaches from a portable pulpit. Shaxton recanted his Protestant belief prior to this scene in order to avoid the fate of Askew and her companions. Religious authorities had illegally tortured Askew, prior to this execution, in an attempt to extract information from her concerning the identity of Protestant sympathizers at the royal court. In the center of the image, observers view the execution from a platform, which has been raised outside the church of St. Bartholomew the Great. Thunder descends from a cloud above, and soldiers on horseback manage spectators on the fringe of the crowd. This woodcut appears in the first through fourth editions (1563, 1570, 1576, and 1583) but first appears in Robert Crowley, The confutation of xiii. articles, wherunto N. Shaxton, late byshop subscribed (1548). Luborsky and Ingram 6083/1, 11222/21, 11223/54. JPEG file (1.23 MB).
  • 8049gb81m?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Southern Methodist University Bridwell Library and Ohio State University Libraries
    Description: Hugh Latimer ("Mr. Latimer") preaches from an open-air pulpit in Westminster. King Edward VI ( "K. Edward") and three other men listen from an indoor window at the right of the image while a large congregation gathers below the pulpit. A few men are scattered on the balcony in the background of the image and a woman sits on the steps of the pulpit with an open book, presumably the Bible. Revised version of Luborsky and Ingram 11222/37 and 11223/80, which appear in all four early English editions (1563, 1570, 1576, 1583). JPEG file (498 KB).
  • Z603r440c?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Southern Methodist University Bridwell Library and Ohio State University Libraries
    Description: Friars forcibly remove Bilney from his pulpit outside Saint George's Church in Ipswich ("Friers pulling Bilney out of the pulpit." ["Friars pulling Bilney out of the pulpit"]; "Saint Georges churche in Ipswich." ["Saint George's church in Ipswich"]). The congregation of men, women, and children sits and stands nearby. This woodcut appears in the first through fourth editions (1563, 1570, 1576, and 1583). Luborsky and Ingram 11222/14, 11223/43. JPEG file (1 MB).