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Filtering by: Collection Engravings from the Richard C. Kessler Reformation Collection Remove constraint Collection: Engravings from the Richard C. Kessler Reformation Collection Subject Printer Device Remove constraint Subject: Printer Device Type Image Remove constraint Type: Image
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  • M326m694g?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Pitts Theology Library
    Description: The printer's device for Johannes Crato (d. 1578) shows Samuel anointing David with oil from a ram's horn, as David kneels in prayer before him
  • Zp38wj76w?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Pitts Theology Library
    Description: The device of publisher Samuel Selfisch shows the prophet Samuel anointing David to be king of Israel
  • St74cw973?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Pitts Theology Library
    Description: With a horn of oil the prophet Samuel anoints young David to become Israel’s next king (1 Samuel 16). One of David’s attributes, the harp, rests on the ground beside him. The woodcut serves as a printer’s device for Samuel Selfisch (or, Seelfisch) of Wittenberg or of Gabriel Schnellboltz (cf. W.L. Strauss, The German Single-Leaf Woodcut 1550-1600, III.1310) for whom H. Krafft printed this volume and comes at the end of one section of the volume. The engraving is dated 1562, below which is the engraver’s symbol (right margin); on the opposite margin is a copyright mark of sorts: the number four with cross; and at the base is the author’s monogram with an arrow rising through it
  • Ws859n10q?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Pitts Theology Library
    Description: The text along the top of the medallion is the Latin version of God's proclamation to Peter, James, and John, "This is my beloved Son; listen to him" (RSV).
  • 5d86p543x?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Pitts Theology Library
    Description: The printer’s device of Wolfgang Köpfel (d. 1554?) shows the Holy Spirit in the form of a dove above two serpents grasping a stone block, perhaps serving as the headstone (= cornerstone) of a building, and so serving as a wordplay on the printer’s name (Kopf = head)
  • 6969z587d?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Pitts Theology Library
    Description: Printer’s device of Vincenzo Vaugris (Venice)
  • Kk91fr47h?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Pitts Theology Library
    Description: The printer's device for Thomas Anshelm Badensis (note the monogram) includes the Hebrew and Greek forms of "Jesus." Here it occurs on the last leaf of the 1518 edition of the great sixteenth-century Christian Hebraist, Johann Reuchlin’s, work on Hebrew accentuation and orthography (dedicated to Cardinal Adrian Florensz Dedal, the future Pope Adrian VI). The device was designed by Hans Baldung Grün, who adapted it from Albrecht Dürer’s 'Three Genii'
  • Fq9781389?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Pitts Theology Library
    Description: Attached to the folio printing of Gaguin’s work on the history of France is the printer’s device of Thielman Kerver (d. 1522). As was often the case, this device incorporates mythological elements (the two unicorns), elaborate flora (an oak tree occupies the central space), and a family crest
  • 3197xr97c?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Pitts Theology Library
    Description: This printer’s device of Robert Estienne (1503?-1559) gives the motto in abbreviated form: NOLI ALTUM SAPERE ('do not become proud,' F. Schreiber, The Estiennes, 247), taken from the Vulgate of Rom 11:20
  • Xp68kn73d?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Pitts Theology Library
    Description: This printer’s device of Robert Estienne (1503?-1559) gives the motto in full form: NOLI ALTUM SAPERE SED TIME ("Do not become proud but stand in awe." Schreiber, The Estiennes, 247), taken from the Vulgate of Rom 11:20
  • Gt54kt755?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Pitts Theology Library
    Description: This printer’s device of Robert Estienne (1503?-1559) gives the motto in abbreviated form: NOLI ALTUM SAPERE ('do not become proud,' F. Schreiber, The Estiennes, 247), taken from the Vulgate of Rom 11:20
  • 9019s799q?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Pitts Theology Library
    Description: Printer's device of Peter Apian (1495-1552)
  • 6w924j37v?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Pitts Theology Library
    Description: The printer's device of Paul Fagius (1504-1549) shows a stork eating frogs, perhaps suggesting a wordplay on the printer's surname (Grk phagein = "to eat")
  • 8049gb240?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Pitts Theology Library
    Description: Printer's device of Oudin Petit (d. 1572)
  • Q524jt90q?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Pitts Theology Library
    Description: Printer’s device of Nicolaus Diuitus, a Parisian printer
  • Th83m4354?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Pitts Theology Library
    Description: The printer’s device of Mathias Apiarius (ca. 1500-1554) features a swarm of bees as a wordplay on his name (apiary = a home for a colony of bees). At the base of the tree is a Bible
  • R494vr35g?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Pitts Theology Library
    Description: The printer’s device of Mathias Apiarius (ca. 1500-1554) features a swarm of bees as a wordplay on his name (apiary = a home for a colony of bees). At the base of the tree is a Bible with the Tetragrammaton (Yahweh) inscribed
  • Qr46r604m?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Pitts Theology Library
    Description: Printer's device of Martin Lechler (d. 1594)
  • B5644x83w?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Pitts Theology Library
    Description: Lazarus Schürer (fl. 1519-1521) was the printer for this edition of Erasmus’ Latin collection of similitudes and comparisons, metaphors, allusions, and poetical and biblical allegories. The device derives from that used by Matthias Schürer (fl. ca. 1508-1520) and may have been designed by Hans Wechtelin on the basis of Albrecht Dürer’s work. Schürer’s name is abbreviated at the bottom of the woodcut, above which is the favorite notched shield (the notch is usually on the other side) and above it the helmet and crest. The use of a sheaf of grain on shield and crest may allude to the printer’s name (modern German scheren = “to shear” [a sheep]), a favorite practice among designers of such devices
  • Sb397f51d?file=thumbnail
    Contributing Institution: Pitts Theology Library
    Description: Printer's device of Juan de Cánova (fl. 1555-1568)