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Filtering by: Format (Original) Hymn text Remove constraint Format (Original): Hymn text
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  • Jw827q70p?file=thumbnail
    Creator: Loughridge, R. M. (Robert McGill), 1809-1900 and Winslett, David, -1862
    Date: 1851
    Contributing Institution: Sounding Spirit
    Description: Prepared by Muskogee convert David Winslett (?–1862) and Anglo-American missionary R. M. Loughridge (1809–1900), Nakcokv Esyvhiketv was the first full-length hymnal published in the Muskogee (Creek) language. In addition to translations of well-known English hymns, this words-only volume includes selections composed in Muskogee. Many of the original hymns were contributed by the Perrymans, a prominent Muskogee family who converted to Presbyterianism after moving to Tulsa in the early 1820s during the first wave of migration to the Indian Territory. Missionization of the Muskogee people escalated following the nation’s forcible removal from its homelands in territories claimed by the states of Alabama, Georgia, and Florida. Exiled in Indian Territory since removal, Muskogees have been singing hymns as a cultural and religious practice since the 1830s. A version of Nakcokv Esyvhiketv remains in print and songs from the volume have become part of Muskogee oral repertoire, including "Aeha! Kut! Cvhesayēcv," Lewis Perryman's translation of Isaac Watts's 1707 "Alas! and did my Savior bleed?"
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  • Hh63t8125?file=thumbnail
    Date: 1875
    Contributing Institution: Sounding Spirit
    Description: With the 1873 installation of Bishop John C. Keener in Mexico City, the Methodist Episcopal Church, South was eager to expand its influence. Intended for use by a growing lay Methodist community, Himnos para uso de la Iglesia Metodista del sur combined newly written hymns with Spanish-language selections circulating in missionary tracts and US-produced hymnals since the late 1840s. Deviating from A Collection of Hymns for Public, Social, and Domestic Worship—the denomination’s flagship hymnal from 1857 to 1887, featuring the standard fare of English-language Methodist hymnodists—Himnos drew from more varied sources. These include William Harris Rule’s 1848 Himnos para el uso de las congregaciones españolas de la iglesia cristiana and the ca. 1870 American Tract Society publication Himnos y cánticos con la música. The resulting ecumenical repertoire served Mexico’s growing Methodist community.
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  • 8623jb10c?file=thumbnail
    Creator: Lloyd, Benjamin, 1804-1860
    Date: 1857
    Contributing Institution: Sounding Spirit
    Description: First published in 1841, Primitive Hymns was the earliest hymnal created specifically for Primitive Baptist use. Still popular among white and black Primitive Baptist communities, this volume is an enduring testament to a singing practice associated with words-only hymnals but spanning both print and oral circulation. Two thirds of the book is comprised of canonical eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century hymns. The remaining texts were collected by compiler Benjamin Lloyd (1804–1860), a businessman, public official, and church elder who edited the book’s earliest editions in Wetumpka, Alabama. Subsequent printings overseen by Lloyd’s widow, daughter-in-law, and granddaughters would preserve the corrected and enlarged edition first issued in 1845. Primitive Hymns has not been substantially revised since the appearance of this 1857 printing. The hymn texts included in this volume remain the core of twenty-first-century Primitive Baptist repertoire.
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  • 9880w414b?file=thumbnail
    Creator: Blackburn, Prof, Kirkland, A. M., 1860-1919, Kirkland, R. S., 1865-1933, and Kirkland, J. V., 1857-1918
    Date: 1896~/1898~
    Contributing Institution: Sounding Spirit
    Description: Compiled by three siblings from Waverly, Tennessee—John Vinus Kirkland (1867–1918), Robert Samuel Kirkland (1865–1933), and Anderson Melville Kirkland (1860–1919)—Apostolic Hymns pairs mainline and old-school Baptist hymn texts with an eclectic range of music, including early urban gospel and church hymnody alongside fuging tunes and revival choruses associated with dispersed harmony. Primitive Baptist elders at the time of publication, the Kirkland brothers later joined the Missionary Baptist Church following a series of early twentieth-century controversies over church polity. One notable allegation charged J. V. Kirkland with using Methodist hymnals in a Palmersville, Tennessee, Sunday school. Prominent Primitive Baptist hymnal editors T. B. Ausmus, John Daily, and C. H. Cayce eventually became some of the Kirklands’ most vigorous detractors. In the virulent pamphlet wars of 1904–07, Ausmus, Daily, and Cayce printed pointed critiques of the Kirkland brothers, whose musically modern tendencies threatened more conservative approaches.
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  • Wm118170n?file=thumbnail
    Creator: Alexander, Charles M. (Charles McCallon), 1867-1920
    Date: 1915
    Contributing Institution: Sounding Spirit
    Description: This 1915 Blue Mountains Edition samples from the full-length Alexander's Hymns No. 3 published by Fleming H. Revel later that year. The volume consists of songs that editor Charles McCallon Alexander (1867–1920) popularized during evangelism tours with Presbyterian preacher John Wilbur Cadman and on campaigns for the Pocket Testament League founded by his wife, Helen Cadbury Alexander. Alexander's Hymns No. 3 is a gospel collection featuring music and text intended for the large-scale urban revivals at which Alexander served as a singing evangelist. Though he enjoyed an international career before retiring to England in 1918, Alexander named his Philadelphia-based Blue Mountains Publishing Company after the mountain range near his childhood home in Blount County, Tennessee.
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